twitter pitching

Twitter Pitching

I promised a post about my Twitter pitching adventures. Today I make good on that promise.

Keep in mind I pitched a Sci-Fi book for adults. For anyone interested in the book, THE MISTS OF CALTHAR, click the “Fiction” tab above.

I recently participated in #PitMad and #Pit2Pub. #PitMad was for literary agents, and/or editors, to request samples of books based on a single tweet. #Pit2Pub was for editors at small presses. Simple, right? All I had to do was create interesting tweets about my 89,000 word book. You get 140 characters, or about a sentence, and you had to include the appropriate hashtags with your pitch.

My goal was to gauge interest in my new book and possibly get the attention of a literary agent. I’d say I was successful on both accounts.

I’m not going to name names about which editors and agents showed interest. All I want is to provide numbers and data to any writer/author thinking about trying to pitch their books on Twitter.

Here are the numbers…

#PitMad

I tweeted three different pitches (spaced out during the day) and only got likes on one of them. An editor for a small press liked one of my pitches as well as a literary agent. The literary agent wanted a query letter and the first five pages. I sent them. Some time later the same agent requested the full manuscript, which they now have. I’m calling that a win.

#Pit2Pub

I tweeted four different pitches and got likes on three of them. A grand total of four small presses showed interest, one editor even liked three of my pitches. Again, pretty good. I’m calling this one a win too even though I didn’t submit to any of them. Remember, my goal was only to gauge interest.

My most popular tweet got a total of five likes, or requests, from both twitter pitches. For anyone interested, here it is: “Missing astronauts found on another planet. One man will walk into a war to find his missing family, even if it kills him.”

My only other advice is to make sure you follow the rules. The organizers have them for a reason. Don’t be a douche and think you can do what you want. I also made a point to warn my twitter followers that I was participating in these pitch events. That way they could mute me for the day if they wanted. Be courteous. Be polite. Follow the rules.

For more tips, the fine folks at the McIntosh & Otis Literary Agency have you covered. Check out their post The Art of #TwitterPitching.